Introducing the Biddable IO: The Newest Programmatic Trend for 2017

By Johanna Bauman, Sr. Director of Marketing Communications, PubMatic

If 2016 was the year of the header bidding wrapper for the publisher, it follows that 2017 may very well be the year of the Biddable IO for the marketer. Since programmatic emerged as a key buying channel for marketers, an inherent trade-off has persisted between the efficiency and data-driven decisioning of automation and the transparency and guaranteed nature of the direct buy. That compromise is about to disappear.

In a new white paper, “Automating Brand Spend: The Emergence of the Biddable IO,” we examine the trends that have led to the need for this new tactic. Leveraging data from a survey of over 400 publishers and buyers as well as insights gleaned from our conversations with key industry players, the report provides context for the evolving programmatic direct landscape, and introduces the new tactic that will revolutionize the marketplace: the Biddable IO.

The Rise of Programmatic Direct

Brands are beginning to realize the value of RTB-based auctions in increasing numbers, with many touting the benefits of efficiency and audience targeting as the main drivers of the shift. As technology and quality standards for programmatic inventory improve, more brands are moving in this direction, and premium publishers are chomping at the bit to funnel this spend towards their inventory.  According to our recent survey, 83% of publishers considered programmatic direct to be an important strategy for their business in 2017.

We identified three trends driving brand spend to programmatic:

  1. The Proliferation of Header Bidding
  2. The Explosive Growth of Data Availability
  3. The Increasing Relevance of Attribution

In addition to providing an entre into automated buying for brands who had previously channeled their spend towards direct IOs, programmatic direct is also gaining popularity with the experienced programmatic buyers, as the digital advertising industry pivots back towards a focus on brand safety and inventory quality.

The Compromises of Automated Buying Channels

While providing increased inventory transparency and workflow efficiencies, existing programmatic direct channels require buyers to make compromises:

  • Private Marketplaces (PMPs) provide greater visibility and access to inventory, but do not ensure priority placement within a publisher’s ad server;
  • Private Marketplace Preferred (PMP-P) deals give buyers higher priority access to inventory, but do not contain the guarantee of inventory volume that the brands need for their forecasting;
  • Private Marketplace Guaranteed (PMP-G) deals allow that guaranteed volume buy but does ensure the guaranteed placement access of the direct buy.
  • Automated Guaranteed (AG), alternatively, provides buyers with all the benefits of the direct IO, but does not leverage the data-driven decisioning of programmatic.

The Biddable IO: The Solution to Close The Gap

Innovative buyers are starting to understand the potential that can be unlocked if they are to move their direct IOs to RTB with what we call the Biddable IO. Our survey found that 57% of buyers globally have either completed the transition of direct IOs to programmatic channels, or are in the process of moving them. The rapid adoption of header bidding has provided the foundation for greater brand access to programmatic inventory, and many are looking to take advantage of the opportunity. We believe that the emergence of the Biddable IO will signal a new era of digital media.

Download the full report by clicking here. Please feel free to reach out to discuss the report with your PubMatic account manager or contact PubMatic here and someone will follow up.

 

10 Years Later: Thoughts From PubMatic’s Founders, Part 2

A conversation with Rajeev Goel, Co-Founder & CEO; Amar Goel, Founder & Chairman; Anand Das, Co-Founder & CTO; Mukul Kumar, Co-Founder & Senior Vice President of Engineering

10th-anniversary-logo

As part of our ten year anniversary celebrations this quarter, we asked PubMatic founders Rajeev Goel, Amar Goel, Anand Das and Mukul Kumar to think back on some of their memories and experiences of founding the company as well as over the past ten years of running it.

Continuing on our previous discussion about the first year at PubMatic, in this post our founders offer some insights into what they’ve learned over the past ten years and offer a few messages they would like to share with our team around the globe.

Q: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve experienced or learned during your time at PubMatic?

goel_amar-bwAmar Goel
: Every day I spend at PubMatic reinforces how important people are. It’s amazing when I look around and see where we’re doing best, and it’s always in areas where we have great people working. That’s also where we have the most fun.

The other thing I’ve really learned at PubMatic is that different markets are truly different. There are a lot of similarities, it’s true, but I think it’s incredibly interesting to see how different leading publishers in the U.S. are from leading publishers in Europe or Asia. For example, most of the bigger display publishers in a market like Germany or France, or even Australia, are truly dominant in their markets, unlike in the U.S. That really impacts the mentality those publishers have and the types of solutions that resonate with them.

kumar_mukul-bwMukul Kumar: I’ve been surprised on several occasions. In fact, each phase of growth has been very interesting and taught me a lot. The most interesting thing that I’ve learned is “Nothing is impossible.” If you want to solve a problem, if you have the will, then you can solve any problem.

 

das_anand-bwAnand Das: Each phase of growth has been a learning experience. One of the things I’ve learned is that nothing is impossible, and as Abraham Lincoln said, “The best way to predict your future is to create it.” I can say that we have lived up to both until now, and will continue to do so.


goel_rajeev-bwRajeev Goel
: The most surprising thing that I have learned, as a manger and leader, is the impact that culture can have on employees. Historically, I thought of employees impacting the culture. While this is true, a powerful and well-defined culture can have an equal or greater impact on employees, with respect to shaping their energy, attitude, passion, and drive. We are doing a better job than ever in understanding this and harnessing it, and I can see that our team is enjoying this tremendously.

Q: What are you particularly proud of when it comes to PubMatic?

goel_amar-bwAmar Goel: I am proud of this team for building a global innovator. We were the first SSP, we were the first to do RTB – that in itself is a lifetime of innovation. It took everyone working together to make it happen. Last year was a real challenge, and it says so much about the folks who stayed, and worked hard together, to work through the challenges and make us again one of the best performing companies in the space. Unified Ad Serving is another huge innovation that I think will drive another big wave.

kumar_mukul-bwMukul Kumar: I am proud of the product that I built, the scale that the product can support, the performance of the product, and of course I am proud of the team that I have built. I am also proud of the rate at which we innovate at PubMatic, which keeps us ahead in several areas in the market.

das_anand-bwAnand DasI am proud of the team, the product that we built, the pace of our innovations, the scale we’ve achieved with our product and the overall scale of our business. We have seen lots of ups and downs in the industry and I am proud of our employees, who have helped drive the same pace of innovation throughout.

Last year was a challenge, and I am very proud of the fact that our team worked hard to get through the challenges and make us one of the best performing companies in the space.

goel_rajeev-bw

Rajeev Goel: I am proud of how far we have come as a business over the last 10 years. Most Silicon Valley startups don’t get to product market fit. A small subset of those that do will get to meaningful revenue – even $10M or $15M per year. At this point, companies typically are losing so much money that they get acquired or go out of business. We’ve used a much longer-term approach, and we are one of the few companies in ad tech now generating cash on a quarterly basis. This is extremely rare. It creates a unique opportunity for me as CEO, for our leadership team, and for all of us as employees to think about how to steer the business and where to invest.

Q: Turning to the industry for a moment, what’s the biggest surprise for you in terms of how the space has evolved over the past 10 years? Where do you see our industry going in the next 5-10 years?

goel_amar-bwAmar Goel: Programmatic is completely taking over advertising. I like to say, “All advertising is going digital, and all digital is going programmatic.” When we started ten years ago, programmatic didn’t exist, and even when RTB started it was hard to see all digital going programmatic. I think this journey is only in its third inning, or maybe 5 overs for cricketers, so there’s a long way to go—especially when we look at the direction of the business and format expansions.

kumar_mukul-bwMukul Kumar: The rate of innovation, from the perspective of both business and technology, has been amazing to say the least. The evolution of online advertising from ad-networks to programmatic to header bidding and beyond has happened at a tremendous pace.

 

das_anand-bwAnand Das: One of the first changes in the industry was RTB, when we first started working on it and launching it in the market there were lots of questions on its viability, latency, adoption, etc. Now it’s de-facto in the industry. The next trends to have industry-changing impact were header bidding, then holistic optimization where one looks at all the inventory as a whole for revenue generation. In most of these cases we got there before the rest of the market. In the next five to ten years will see much more movement towards cross-device as mobile devices become more prevalent and new screens open up—think DOOH (digital out of home), connected TV, and other devices coming to market—and as video and other content consumption increases while the world gets more connected with smart devices.

All of this will lead to a more connected experience for the user, with lots of data for targeting; ads will be more relevant and personalized, and attribution will be possible outside of just the display world (think of tracking the interest level of a user who sees an ad on a digital billboard, then targeting that user on other devices like mobile, laptop, smart watch, etc. and tracking purchases completing the whole circle, with users in control of their privacy). We will see better algorithms for optimization, AI and other technologies enhancing the ad experience for the user and providing better ROI for the advertiser. 

goel_rajeev-bw

Rajeev Goel: The biggest surprise for me is that after ten amazing years of innovation, we continue to solve the same problem at its core – which is one of yield optimization and control for publishers. Of course, the technology and tactics are quite different and there are many nuances that continue to change. But at our core, we are solving the same problem. When you consider the leading technology companies, we can say the same for them – Amazon (solving e-commerce problem), Google (solving search and information access problem), SAP (solving enterprise automation problem), Apple (solving an individual communication and expression problem).

Q: And finally, if you could tell PubMatic’s entire global team just one thing, what would it be?

goel_amar-bwAmar Goel: Anything is possible! We never could’ve anticipated that we’d be able to say that we were helping launch an industry that would be doing tens of billions of dollars of volume and transforming digital advertising. Never forget the impact that a small, committed group of individuals can have. I can’t wait to see what we work together to do next!

kumar_mukul-bwMukul Kumar: I would tell the global PubMatic team to think big—really big—to keep pushing your limits, go get that customer, and go build that product!

 

das_anand-bwAnand Das: I like quotes, so here are a few that I would like to share with the PubMatic team:

“The universe has no restrictions. You place restrictions on the universe with your expectations” – Deepak Chopra

Always have high expectations and think big.

“If you are not willing to risk the unusual, you will have to settle for the ordinary” – Jim Rohn

Challenge the norm, break barriers, push your limits, take risks and make things happen, nothing is impossible.

goel_rajeev-bw

Rajeev Goel: I would tell them to keep making the impossible possible. If you consider our actions and results over the past 12 months, we have done exactly this. We slimmed down our customer list, we automated the product to a great extent, and all with a smaller and better team. We made possible what in many ways we thought we couldn’t do a year ago (including myself). We only need to look at our own track record to inspire ourselves…


 

Stay tuned for additional content featuring insights from some of PubMatic’s longest tenured employees as they think back on the changes they have seen at PubMatic and in the industry over the past 5-10 years.

PubAcademy UK: Publishers’ Choice

Our penultimate PubAcademy of the year took place on November 9th in London, bringing publishers and buyers together to discuss the choices publishers are forced to make in order to successfully navigate the sometimes choppy waters of programmatic. We also took this opportunity to discuss how sellers and buyers can work better together to ensure all parties involved realise the value on offer.

Through the discussions that took place, we were able to identify the four key themes that seemed to resonate well with attendees:

Publishers Want to Take Back Control of Ad Decisioning

It would seem that the majority of our industry is familiar with the concept that today’s legacy ad serving infrastructure is ill equipped to help publishers manage and capture holistic yield. It is clear that many publishers are still trying to figure out how they can explore and implement alternative, open ad serving set-ups whilst minimizing the disruption to their businesses.

Working with a holistic monetization platform such as PubMatic SEVEN, with its modular approach, allows publishers to choose which products or solution sets they want to integrate and when. Only by having this choice will publishers truly be able to realise the full potential of their digital assets.

Publishers Want Partners, Not Tech Vendors

While the continued evolution of the market, its increasing complexity, and the plethora of tech vendor choices available all play a role in driving programmatic spend, they have just as much potential to inhibit growth as well.

In that light, our key panelists highlighted the importance of establishing two-way partnerships between publishers and their tech vendors. When publishers are evaluating technology partners, the primary concern is finding ones that are open, transparent and willing to integrate with each other for the good of the publisher and the overall digital media market.

Header Bidding is Still a Hot Topic, But The Conversation is Evolving

During our discussion we challenged the hypothesis that header bidding is little more than “waterfall” 2.0. Many publishers are still allocating priorities as they continue to build out strategies around their direct sold books of business and where the sweet spot can exist between the IO and programmatic direct. Regardless, all of our publisher panelists were in agreement that header bidding has had a positive effect on yield and that it’s here to stay. The conversation is evolving, as is the need. Having to manage multiple header tags and the impact they have on page performance and user experience remains a concern.

Hence the exploration of the pros and cons of solutions that address these potential issues, such as wrapper tags and server side integrations, are going to be vital over the coming months. Looking forward, there remains a lot of uncertainty around whether open source or proprietary is the route to take. The jury’s still out, but expect a verdict soon.

Publishers and Buyers Still Have Work to Do to Make the Marriage A Happy One

Our panel of publishers and buyers shared some of their key asks of each other to help everyone realise the potential that programmatic offers. In no particular order:

  • Make PMP deals more discoverable and design them to meet buyers’ needs. Building PMP deals around curated audiences, for example, or being sure to support the buying models of agencies;
  • Design PMPs to be ‘always on’ and proactively troubleshoot when they are underperforming;
  • Design offers that support the buying models that agencies will be adopting in 2017—the combination of programmatic AND automated guaranteed, for example;
  • Provide access to more targetable and segmented second-party data to drive increased bid density;
  • Finally, communicate more frequently and be more transparent.

pa_logofinaluk112216About PubAcademy

PubAcademy is a global industry education initiative PubMatic launched to help ensure our customers and partners are in the best position to achieve their individual business goals and address the unique set of challenges that they face in this ever changing world of programmatic.

For more information about our platform, SEVEN, visit PubMatic’s website here or email info@pubmatic.com. To find out more about PubMatic’s PubAcademy events, including when the next one will be held in your region, or to suggest a topic or speaker for a PubAcademy session, email PubAcademy@PubMatic.com.

10 Years Later: Thoughts From PubMatic’s Founders, Part 1

A conversation with Rajeev Goel, Co-Founder & CEO; Amar Goel, Founder & Chairman; Anand Das, Co-Founder & CTO; Mukul Kumar, Co-Founder & Senior Vice President of Engineering

10th-anniversary-logoAs many of you already know, PubMatic was founded in 2006 by Rajeev Goel, Amar Goel, Anand Das and Mukul Kumar. What began as an ambitious four-person startup has become a global company with more than 350 employees across 11 offices worldwide.

This quarter the team here at PubMatic is celebrating the company’s tenth anniversary—ten years of innovating for the digital media ecosystem—and we thought it would be interesting to ask our founders to share their thoughts on PubMatic’s early years and how the company, and the team, has grown and evolved since then.

We hope you enjoy this inside look at our company’s origins. Be sure to check back as we continue to share more insights from our founders over the coming weeks!

Q: What’s your favorite memory from the first year of PubMatic?

Amar Goel: To this day, my favorite memory remains the first time I printed out the wireframes for version 0.1 of PubMatic (remember, this was ten years ago!). I remember having a big smile on my face because this was one of the first physical manifestations of our product coming to life and becoming “real.”

Obviously, it wasn’t really real until we started serving impressions and helping publishers, but seeing those mockups made the fact that we were doing this truly tangible for the first time!

Mukul and Anand

Mukul and Anand

Mukul Kumar: Although I have many favorite memories from the first year, one of the top ones is when we wrote our first ad server in Java. It wouldn’t perform as well as we wanted it to, so I sat up all night debugging the ad server only to completely rewrite the entire thing just a few days later.

My second favorite story is when Amar called me one day to say that it “would be nice to see how many impressions we served” (of course, we didn’t have any reporting tools at the time). I asked him, “why would anyone want to see that?” But after about an hour of coding I had written the first reporting interface for PubMatic.

Another good one was when we started hiring and a candidate from Bangalore wanted to fly to Pune for the interview. He asked me, “Who will handle my travel arrangements?” I told him, “Let me transfer you to the Travel Department,” and I transferred the call to Andy, who became the Travel Department for that call.

My last favorite memory from the first year are the times when Andy and I would watch the impressions served in front of us and feel great about the software—this was right after we developed the alpha.

Anand Das: There are definitely many favorite memories from the first year. As Mukul said, one of them is when we implemented the ad server in Java and our first customer—an online dating website—started using our service. The ad server used to go down a couple times per day and wasn’t performing to the level we wanted. Mukul and I used to be coding and monitoring the ad server and managing both sometimes continuously for 24 hours, although eighteen-hour days were the norm.

At that time I had a collarbone fracture with a rod in my shoulder that needed to be removed, but Mukul and I had agreed that we couldn’t continue with the Java ad server based on its performance. Two days prior to my surgery I started rewriting the code in C, completed testing and launched the new server in a day, monitored it for the next day and then checked myself into the hospital for the surgery.

Once I was out of surgery I remember the doctor asking me what an “ad server” was because I’d been talking about it after they administered the anesthetic. The first call I made after I regained consciousness was to Mukul to check on the ad server up time and I was thrilled that it was up and performing well. I remember I also interviewed the second engineer we hired from the hospital.

My second favorite memory from the first year was when Google refused to give us access to their Ad Sense reporting API, even after seeing a complete demo of our system. They gave us that news on February 26th, 2007 and we had our alpha launch with our first client scheduled for March 14th. That was the day that Amar, Mukul and I were very discouraged because our whole idea depended on getting data from the ad networks and using it for optimization. We only had two networks integrated at that time, one of which was Google Ad Sense, and without reporting API access we couldn’t do any reporting.

That night Mukul and I had a frank conversation about Google’s decision and then we went home, but I couldn’t sleep. I started working on the idea of automating the browser to act like a human by logging into the website to access reporting data and I actually got a prototype working.

Mukul and I called Amar the next evening and told him, “We don’t need API access, we have a way out.” We ended up with a web-wrapping-based reporting solution on our end and launched the alpha without any glitches. It certainly boosted morale, and I remember Mukul and I telling each other that no power can stop us; if we want to do something, we will!

Rajeev Goel: Completing the specification for the first version of the PubMatic system, which I called the “Web Ad Optimizer”. It took a lot of work marrying vision with reality, but it was great to put down on paper what we could do so that Mukul, Anand, and Amar could turn it into code.

Another memory is when we were talking to an initial round of 15-20 venture capitalists to see if they were interested in what we were doing. They all said no; they didn’t believe anyone could make money charging publishers. While on the one hand that was discouraging, but on the other I knew that we were onto something unique and visionary. Given that most (certainly not all) VCs tend to move in herds, the feedback made sense.

Q: What did you envision for PubMatic when you started the company? Did you ever think it would be as large, global and successful as it is ten years later?

Amar Goel: When we launched PubMatic it was all about how to help publishers and give them new tools. We were the first SSP to launch—it was a very new industry at the time, considering we were the ones starting it. We were the first to bring RTB to the supply side. But even we didn’t realize how big RTB would be when we founded the company.

It’s truly exciting to see how digital advertising is evolving, and to be on the forefront of that. Programmatic is an uber trend, and we are so focused on making it real for publishers. It has been very rewarding to build a global company with people, cultures and practices from all over the world!

Mukul Kumar: I didn’t think it would be so big. We started a “startup,” then we began growing. I was very possessive of the software I wrote at first and was reluctant to give up coding after we started hiring engineers, but since then each year has been more amazing than the last.komliday36photo1

Anand Das: I didn’t think it would be so big and at this scale. As Mukul said, we started a “startup” and hoped that our customers would utilize what we were providing. Then we started growing and generating revenue, hiring people, opening up offices in various countries.

Even today I find it difficult not to code, even with all the engineers around—you need to keep the skillset sharp! But since then every year has been even more amazing.

Rajeev Goel: I could have never dreamed that programmatic and RTB would become a $50B+ industry, or that it would become the predominant technology for monetization of premium direct inventory as well as unsold inventory. So no, we did not envision that the opportunity would be so big or that we could build such a big company. We knew that the problem area we were attacking was generally a good space to go after, though.

I also did not think I would have the opportunity, along with Amar, Mukul, and Anand, to manage through so many phases of a company – vision, product-market fit, revenue scaling, profitability, cash generation. These are all very different chapters in the life of a company, and it’s rare that Silicon Valley startups move through all phases successfully.

Q: What are the biggest challenges you’ve faced since founding the company?

Amar Goel: Rapid change always creates challenges. When you’re growing super fast it creates challenges around scaling processes and people and being able to think broadly enough. I would say 2013 and 2014 were about super growth at PubMatic. Then 2015 was the opposite side of that as we faced some very tough decisions.

I am so proud of the team for working together and pushing so hard to get through these issues to return us to a position of strength today.

In 2007 when we launched externally we had thousands of publishers and shortly thereafter hundreds of millions of impressions flowing through PubMatic, the industry was so new it was unclear whether publishers would pay. We were confident they would since we were delivering revenue, but many investors thought that the publishers would never pay us Thank god those investors were wrong!

Mukul Kumar: Scaling the product to the next level, hiring the best talent and thinking about what’s next!

Anand Das: Definitely scaling the product to the next level before hitting the wall, as well as hiring the best talent and envisioning what’s next and then making bets in terms of technology investment.

Rajeev Goel: The product cycles in the industry are very short (RTB, PMP, audience data, header bidding, mobile, video, reporting, etc.) and there are a lot of innovation opportunities. It’s always a challenge to figure out what to do and what NOT to do. Of course, if you make the wrong call it can literally end the company – many companies that were around 10 years ago are no longer here because they missed the shift to mobile or they missed the shift to programmatic.

Finding the right team members and helping them scale as the company has scaled is also a significant challenge but incredibly important to get right. As discussed earlier, we have been through many phases of the company in the past 10 years, and success requires very talented, passionate, and flexible people at all areas in the organization. We have honed our focus on supporting our team members and helping them both to be successful and to grow themselves professionally, which is very rewarding.


Stay tuned for more insights from PubMatic’s founders when we release the rest of our discussion, touching upon the changes they’ve seen in the industry over the last ten years, what they expect to see in the next five years, and some of the biggest surprises they’ve encountered during their PubMatic journey.

 

 

 

 

Insights from PubMatic’s Q3 2016 Quarterly Mobile Index

After analyzing the data behind the billions of impressions that flow through PubMatic’s SEVEN platform on a daily basis, we’ve seen four key trends emerge that demonstrate the power of programmatic for mobile advertising. PubMatic’s Q3 2016 Quarterly Mobile Index (QMI), released today, shows that publishers are seeing tremendous results in mobile performance and efficiency.

The two most significant findings from our Q3 2016 QMI boil down simply to ‘private marketplace’ and ‘header bidding.’ Basically, we’re seeing mobile rapidly adopt strategies and tactics for programmatic buying and selling at a faster pace than display has executed on.

Through our analysis we found that mobile private marketplace inventory is valued nearly 200 percent more than the mobile average. Given the benefits of mobile private marketplaces—specifically, the ability to serve ads in environments that provide transparency, help limit fraud and promote accountability—this growth demonstrates the continued shift of brand dollars to programmatic as brands become more comfortable with this channel. Going a step further and looking at the IAB publisher categories that saw the most growth in mobile web eCPM (Entertainment & Leisure, Real Estate, Sports & Automotive, etc.), it’s clear that publishers in the Lifestyle category should make premium mobile inventory available to buyers via PMP.

Our report also demonstrates that publishers around the globe are adopting header bidding strategies for their mobile web inventory as the result of the significant lift generated when all sales channels are able to compete at the impression level. While mobile web header bidding impressions were just emerging one year ago, PubMatic found that mobile web accounted for nearly one-in-five impressions transacted via header bidding in Q3 2016.

Header bidding impressions create more opportunities for advertisers to win an auction for the highly-coveted mobile consumer. Not only does this tactic generate higher eCPMs due to demand, but valuable cookie information gets passed that will allow buyers to make better decisions as well. Now that header bidding is table stakes for desktop and mobile web, the next frontier will include bringing header bidding beyond the header and into mobile apps. This will ultimately provide increased opportunities for growth.

Furthermore, during the Q3 Back-to-School season, retail publishers saw more than 230 percent increase in mobile web eCPM value. Shoppers are spending more of their time researching products and making purchased on their mobile devices, providing further opportunities for effective and engaging mobile advertising. This is particularly important heading into the retail-obsessed holiday season, during which publishers in the retail category should ensure that they are making their higher-quality mobile inventory accessible to advertisers targeting mobile consumers.

Although mobile app inventory share increased worldwide, mobile web monetization continued to provide the largest opportunity for premium publishers. PubMatic data shows that mobile web eCPMs grew twice as fast as mobile app eCPMs between Q3 2015 and Q3 2016, with a growth rate of 32 percent versus 16 percent for mobile apps. Advertisers and publishers need to balance mobile strategy to leverage the growing popularity of apps and monetization opportunity with mobile web. Partnering with programmatic experts can help achieve this goal.

We’ve summarized the key findings from our latest Quarterly Mobile Index in the infographic below, and you can download the full report by clicking here. Be sure to check back in a few months for our Q4 2016 Quarterly Mobile Index as well.

infographic_Q3_QMI_v4b

PubMatic @ Advertising Week

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It’s hard to believe that fall is here already and another Advertising Week is upon us! The PubMatic team is excited to kick off Advertising Week with an action-packed schedule of events, and we hope that you’ll join us!

MMS @ Advertising Week – “Taking Back Control”
Date: Monday, September 26
Time: 3:25 pm
Location: IAC Building – 555 W 18th Street

Kirk & Peter MMSDon’t miss PubMatic President Kirk McDonald and Peter Foster, GM of Global Advertising and Brand Solutions at Match Group, as they discuss publishers “Taking Back Control” during MMS at Advertising Week. Publishers need to evolve—and even join forces—in order to survive and thrive in today’s digital advertising ecosystem. Discover how forward-thinking companies like Match Group are addressing these questions head-on to ensure success today, tomorrow and in the future.



PubMatic’s PubAcademy US – “Header Bidding: Tactics & Strategies”
Date: Tuesday, September 27
Time: 4:00 pm
Location: PubMatic NYC – 229 W 43rd Street, 7th Floor 

For the first time PubMatic’s international thought leadership series, PubAcademy, comes to the US with a special edition for Advertising Week in New York City. The Header Bidding: Tactics and Strategies session will feature insights from industry leaders, followed by a brief Q&A and networking with drinks and nibbles.

Moderator:  Craig Chinn, VP of Customer Success, PubMatic
Panelists:    

  • Tim Wolfe, VP of Ad Operations, Gannett
  • Tanuj Joshi, Head of Media Partnerships, MediaMath
  • Ryan Teshima-McCormick, Director of Marketplace Development, Rocket Fuel
  • Ben Feldman, Senior Director of Operations, PubMatic

Register to Attend!



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Advertising Week – Telling Stories Across Screens & Programmatic TV
“The Cross-Screen Programmatic Dialogue”
Date: Thursday, September 29
Time: 4:15 pm
Location: Times Center Hall, ADARA Stage – 242 W 41st Street

PubMatic President Kirk McDonald takes the stage at Advertising Week with Andrew Feigenson, Managing Director of Digital at Nielsen, Eric Franchi, Co-Founder of Undertone and Seth Rogin, President & CEO of Nucleus Marketing Solutions to discuss the impact of digital, video, and mobile on the art of storytelling and story-making. These industry experts will address whether it’s possible to have a balance between content driving audience and content driving revenue in the digital world; how they are successfully integrating services and messaging into story-led multi-platform universes of original content; tactics for reaching target audiences in unique ways that grow brand awareness, and loyalty and advocacy.


We hope that you’re able to join us for our special Advertising Week edition of PubAcademy and we look forward to all the lively and informative conversations we’ll be having together!

Infographic: Maximizing Mobile Moments

Insights from PubMatic’s Q2 2016 Quarterly Mobile Index

In the digital media industry, we constantly hear about the “mobile-first consumer” – the person who expects immediate access to information in the palm of his or her hand, whether at home or on the go.

We know that consumer behavior continues to shift towards this small screen—in fact, comScore reported[1] earlier this year that audiences now spend more time consuming media via mobile than they do on desktop devices. This raises the question of how publishers and media buyers can ensure that they are maximizing the potential of these high-value mobile moments?

The PubMatic platform, SEVEN, gives us access to terabytes of data , and we leverage this vast information set to identify trends around emerging media practices to help the digital media industry stay ahead of shifting content and advertising consumption behaviors. For the past year, our proprietary research report, the Quarterly Mobile Index (QMI), has provided publishers and buyers alike with helpful insights around mobile advertising. The Q2 2016 QMI can be downloaded here.

To complement the full QMI report, we’ve also put together “Maximizing Mobile Moments,” an infographic that outlines the three key trends identified in this edition of the QMI.

Be sure to check out the infographic, as well as the full report, which provides both publishers and media buyers with the information they need to maximize the effectiveness of their mobile strategies.

Q2 2016 QMI Infographic

[1] http://www.businessinsider.com/people-now-spend-more-internet-time-on-mobile-than-desktops-or-laptops-2016-4

PubMatic Launches SEVEN @Dmexco

Heading to Dmexco this week? Be sure to stop by the PubMatic Booth, Hall 8, Aisle C069 to find out about our latest product launch: SEVEN, PubMatic’s comprehensive revenue management platform that gives publishers full control of their digital assets and gives media buyers the ability to purchase verified audiences and premium inventory at scale across all screens, channels and formats.

The SEVEN platform provides solutions for:

  • Holistic management of ad decisioning;
  • Automating the buying and selling of inventory;
  • Managing quality control and compliance;
  • Providing real-time data and analytics.

SEVEN encompasses both PubMatic’s existing offerings–including its SSP, RTB, PMP, Analytics, Header Bidding, Curated Audiences, and more,–as well as new solutions including the Unified Ad Server and OpenWrap, within these four solution areas.

PubMatic’s Unified Ad Server is the first built specifically to enable seamless workflow across all ad revenue channels, whether guaranteed direct sold campaigns, private marketplace, private marketplace guaranteed, automated guaranteed, open exchange or integrated wrapper. With PubMatic’s Unified Ad Server, publishers now have the ability to:

  • Manage programmatic and non-programmatic inventory from a single view;
  • Optimize revenue across sales channels without jeopardizing guarantees or brand control requirements;
  • Access enterprise-grade analytics with real-time data and insights.

“It’s great to see companies like PubMatic developing the ability for publishers like us to optimize revenue across channels—especially without sacrificing guarantees,” said Stefan Carlsson, Head of Programmatic at Bonnier Tidskrifter. “With the launch of SEVEN it’s clear that they have a lot more in store as well.”

To find out more about SEVEN, visit www.PubMatic.com or visit the team at Dmexco this week at the PubMatic Booth, Hall 8 Aisle C069.

Don’t Miss PubMatic’s Exclusive Content at Dmexco

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Finalizing your plans for Dmexco? Don’t miss our exclusive content sessions, featuring guest speakers and PubMatic programmatic experts discussing some of the hottest topics facing media buyers and sellers today, including:

  • Mobile web monetization;
  • Executing header bidding tactics;
  • Consequences of living in a digital media duopoly dominated by players like Facebook and Google.

Stop by the PubMatic booth in Hall 8, Aisle C069 for the following conversations:

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Will King, Commercial Director, Voluum

The Mobile Web is Dead. Long Live the Mobile Web.
Wed, 14 Sept. 11:00 – 11:30
Thurs, 15 Sept. 15:30 – 16:00

With consumers spending as much as 85 percent of their mobile time immersed in apps, how can publishers really make money from their mobile websites?

Join Will King, Commercial Director at Voluum, and PubMatic’s UK Country Manager Paul Gubbins as they discuss what publishers need to think about and do in order to maximize the value of their mobile web inventory, and how they’re helping advertisers take advantage of this opportunity to speak to the highly engaged mobile audience.

Header Bidding Power Hour
Wed., 14 Sept. 14:30-15:30
Thurs., 15 Sept. 13:00-14:00

By now we’re all familiar with header bidding’s widespread adoption and how it can benefit publishers, but what benefits do header bidding and wrapper solutions provide for media buyers? How will header bidding evolve beyond a necessary hack to a standardized, measurable part of the programmatic ecosystem?

Stop by our Header Bidding Power Hour for an opportunity to ask any of PubMatic’s programmatic experts all of your questions about header bidding, wrapper solutions, server-side solutions, and what they mean for publishers and media buyers today and in the future.

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Amir Malik, Programmatic Director, Trinity Mirror

Publishers: Who’s Really in Control?
Wed., 14 Sept. 16:00-16:30
Thurs., 15 Sept. 11:00-11:30

With forecasts predicting that 85% of all incremental digital revenue will be spent with either Facebook or Google, publishers are faced with the troubling question of who is really in control of their digital strategy—and their most valuable asset, the consumer connection.

Join Amir Malik, Director of Programmatic and Digital at Trinity Mirror, and PubMatic President Kirk McDonald as they take a hard look at the impact of living in a digital media duopoly, what this means for publishers today and in the future, as well as what they can do now to take back control.

Find out more by following PubMatic on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn.